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Zoology

First-year level courses in Zoology

There are two first-year courses in Zoology. CEL 101 is normally held in the first semester and ZOO 101 in the second semester. Credit may be obtained in each course separately and, in addition, an aggregate mark of at least 50% will be deemed to be equivalent to a two-credit course ZOO 1 (or BIO 1, for Pharmacy students), provided that a candidate obtains the required sub-minimum (45%) in each component. However, students wishing to major in Zoology and/or Entomology must normally obtain credit in both components separately. Supplementary examinations may be awarded in either course, provided that a candidate achieves 35% in semester 1 and 45% in semester 2.

Adequate performance (in the form of at least a DP) for CEL 101 is required before a student may register for ZOO 101.

CEL 101: Cell Biology

This course compares cell structure in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and examines cellular processes including cell to cell communication, photosynthesis and cell respiration. Cell division and fundamental genetics, including the structure of genetic material and how it controls cellular processes, are also covered.

ZOO 101: Animal Diversity, Structure and Function

This course provides an introduction to the evolution, systematics, structure and functional biology of the animal kingdom, both vertebrate and invertebrate.

Second-year level courses in Zoology

There are two independent second-year courses in Zoology. ZOO 201 is normally held in the first semester and ZOO 202 in the second semester. Credit may be obtained in each course separately and, in addition, an aggregate mark of at least 50% will be deemed to be equivalent to a two-credit course ZOO 2, provided that a candidate obtains the required subminimum in each component. No supplementary examinations will be offered for either course.

Practical reports, essays, seminars and class tests collectively comprise the class mark, which forms part of the final mark.

When the intention is to major in Zoology, credit in Zoology (CEL 101, ZOO 101) Botany (BOT 102), and Chemistry (CHE 1) is normally required before a student may register for ZOO 201 or ZOO 202. Permission may be granted to repeat CHE 1 or BOT 102 concurrently with ZOO 201 and ZOO 202. Adequate performance (at least 40%) in the first semester is required before a student may register for the second semester.

ZOO 201: Principles of Ecology and Evolution

This course concerns the general principles of ecology, micro- and macro-evolution. Topics covered include niche theory, biogeography, species interactions, succession and disturbance, biodiversity, evolution and behaviour. There is normally an ecology field trip during April.

ZOO 202: Environmental and Behavioural Physiology

This course examines the effects of environmental variables such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, ions, water, temperature, and other external stimuli on how animals function and how different groups of animals respond to different environmental conditions and stimuli.

Third-year level courses in Zoology

There are two independent third year courses in Zoology. A student wishing to major in Zoology must obtain credit in ZOO 301 and ZOO 302. Credit may be obtained in each of these courses separately. Aggregation will be deemed equivalent to a two credit course ZOO 3, provided the candidate obtains the required subminimum in each semester. No supplementary examinations are offered in third-year courses. Practical reports, essays, seminars and class tests collectively comprise the class mark, which forms part of the final course mark. A research project, which is carried out during the year, forms a component of each semester in Zoology. The project mark for the first semester will be based on a mid-year report. Students who register for one semester only either undertake a shorter project or write an extended essay. The examination may include an oral examination at the discretion of the examiners.

When the intention is to major in Zoology, credit in ZOO 201 and ZOO 202 is required before a student may register for a third-year semester. Adequate performance (at least 40%) in the first semester is required before a student may register for the second semester.

ZOO 301: African Terrestrial Zoology

This course uses the African fauna to illustrate the principles of behavioural and physiological adaptation to terrestrial habitats. An introductory section on African biogeography is followed by an examination of the problems and solutions associated with life in particular environments. These include arid habitats, montane and forest habitats and grasslands/savanna. A short field trip may be held.

ZOO 302: Marine Biology

The oceans have a profound effect on life on earth, providing food for man and influencing both weather and climate. This course emphasises the physical properties of the marine environment and how these shape species' interactions and food webs. Topics covered include ocean circulation, primary production, ecology of the deep sea, rocky shores, sandy beaches and estuaries, planktonic food webs and pelagic/demersal fisheries, and the behavioural and physiological ecology of intertidal invertebrates.

ZOOLOGY 3 PROJECTS 2016 

 

Last Modified :Thu, 18 Feb 2016 09:08:01 SAST