Kudzai Barure is currently reading for a doctoral degree under the Urban Connections in African Popular Imaginaries (UCAPI) research project. His research interests focus on Popular Culture, Digital short-fiction, and New modes of writing.

His study focuses on the representations of everyday life in selected Zimbabwean popular short fiction written and or translated into English by marginalised writers who exist on the periphery of the Zimbabwean literary canon. It demonstrates how fictional representations of everyday life are used by marginalized authors to inventively resist and interrogate themes such as  sexuality, inequality, violence, crime, migration, corruption, nepotism. The thesis examines short fiction published in popular print magazines and on digital platforms such as blogs and Facebook.  This research falls within the ambit of popular culture and literature. Kudzai draws on Stephanie Newell and Onookome Okome's episteme of everyday life to argue that popular short-fiction provides a platform for marginalised writers to express themselves in ways that respond directly to social, political, and economic issues. 

Last Modified: Tue, 03 Nov 2020 21:33:50 SAST