Rhodes>Classics>Courses

Classical Studies: courses
CLASSICS


Classics is the study of the art, history, thought and literature of ancient cultures. All ancient texts
are studied in translation: no knowledge of the ancient languages is required (although it is
recommended for students intending to continue their studies at a postgraduate level).
In all Classics undergraduate classes, the final mark is calculated as 60% coursework, 40% exam
(papers are written in June and November). There are three weekly lectures and a weekly tutorial.
Tutorial exercises (50% of coursework) are submitted each week, and one assignment (50% of
coursework) is completed each term.
Classics may be taken as a three-year major (CLA 1, 2, 3), or as a two-year major (CLA 2, 3) in the
second and third years of a BA degree.


Classics 1 (CLA 101/102)


This is a semesterised, one-year course designed as a foundational and general introduction to the
study of the ancient world.


Classics 101


First-year, first-semester course. Entrance requirements: None.
This course takes up the origins of urbanization in Egypt and Mesopotamia and entails a study of
Greek mythology, focusing on the Trojan War and the adventures of the wandering hero Odysseus,
and the world of the Early Eastern Mediterranean. All students are eligible for a supplementary
exam for CLA 101, regardless of their final mark.


Classics 102


First-year, second-semester course. Entrance requirements: None
This course currently (2021) consists of two term-length modules: The ‘Axial Age’ looks at the
emergence of new philosophies across the world around the year 500 BCE, with a focus on Socrates
(Greece), Buddha (India) and Confucius (China). ‘Mythology’ introduces students to the various types
of myth and methods of interpretation, with examples drawn from Greek myth and from across the
world.


Classics 2 (CLA 201/202)


Second-year semesterised course. Entrance requirements: A pass in any first-year Humanities
subject: no previous study in Classics is required for entrance to this course.
Classics 2 (CLA 201/202), consists of a closer study of the history and great works of the ancient
world. It ranges in its specific content from close readings in Greek and Roman epic, tragedy, comedy
and love poetry, to ancient philosophy, myth and religion, social and political history and Classical
receptions. Modules on Bronze Age, African, Indian and Chinese civilisations may be included in the
year’s syllabus. There are three weekly lectures and a weekly tutorial. Tutorial exercises (50% of
coursework) are completed each week, and one assignment (50% of coursework) is submitted each
term.


Classics 3 (CLA 301/302)


Third-year semesterised course. Entrance requirements: A pass in Classics 201 and 202.
The syllabus for Classics 2 & 3 is on a revolving 2-year cycle so that Classics 2 & 3 students sit classes
together. In even years the focus is on Greece, in odd years Rome. Classics 3 students, while studying
the same content, are assessed differently and are set different assignments: one exam per
semester, four essay assignments or two and a long essay or research project of 4000-5000 words.

Weekly tutorials with the course lecturer account for 50% of the class mark.

Classics Honours


Entrance requirements: A completed degree with Classics 3 as a major, with a final mark of 60% or
above for Classics 3.
Five papers are written, tailored to the interests of the student. One paper is a research essay of 8-
10,000 words, the other four are coursework. Taught papers may cover individual Classical authors,
literary genres, ancient history, religion, art and society, and are selected each year the discretion of
the staff in consultation with students. Students are encouraged to prepare at least one of their
papers for publication. Classics Honours students have a lecturer designated as a personal tutor with
whom they regularly meet.


MA & PhD in Classics

These degrees are offered and are examined by full thesis.

GREEK & LATIN


Greek and Latin are three-year major subjects, which may be studied for degree curricula in the
Faculty of Humanities. No previous knowledge of Greek is required to enter Greek 101 or of Latin to
enter Latin 101.
In all Greek and Latin undergraduate classes, the final mark is calculated as 40% coursework, 60%
exam (papers written in June and November). There are three weekly lectures and a weekly tutorial.
Tutorial exercises (50% of coursework) are submitted each week, and one test or assignment (50%
of coursework) is completed each term.


Greek 101


First-year, first-semester course. Entrance requirements: None
This is a beginner’s course, which offers an introduction to Greek, including the reading of selected
passages, translation from Greek to English and from English to Greek, and the study of various
aspects of the Greek world. The textbook used is ‘Reading Greek’ by the Joint Association of Classical
Teachers (JACT).


Greek 102


First-year, second-semester course. Entrance requirements: Greek 101.
Continued reading of texts, translation Greek to English and from English to Greek and study of
aspects of Greek culture, particularly in Classical Athens.


Greek 2


Second-year, full-year course. Entrance requirements: A 60% pass in Greek 101 and 102.
Greek 2 involves the reading of selected Greek texts, translation from Greek into English and from
English into Greek. A particular author (e.g. Homer, Herodotus, Plato, Euripides), work or genre is
studied each term.


Greek 3


Third-year, full-year course. Entrance requirements: A pass in Greek 2.
Greek 3 involves the reading of selected Greek texts, translation from Greek into English, and from
English into Greek. A particular author (e.g. Thucydides, Pindar, Aeschylus, Aristophanes), work or
genre (e.g. lyric poetry) is studied each term. Texts may be set for self-study.

Latin 101


First-year, first-semester course. Entrance requirements: None.
This is a beginner’s course, which offers an introduction to Latin, including the reading of selected
passages, translation from Latin to English and from English to Latin, and the study of various aspects
of the Graeco-Roman world. The course also focuses on developing students’ general competence in
language, especially through a study of the origins of English words and the acquisition of
vocabulary. The textbook used is the ‘Oxford Latin Course’ (Balme & Morwood).


Latin 102


First-year, second-semester course. Entrance requirements: A pass in Latin 101.
In terms of language the focus will be entirely on Latin, with continued reading of texts, translation
from Latin to English and from English to Latin and study of aspects of Roman culture.


Latin 2


Second-year, full-year course. Entrance requirements: A 60% pass in Latin 101 and 102, or a rating of
at least 5 in the National Senior Certificate.
Latin 2 involves the reading of selected Latin texts, translation from Latin into English, and from
English into Latin. A particular author (e.g. Caesar, Cicero, Horace, Catullus), work or genre is studied
each term.


Latin 3


Third-year, full-year course. Entrance requirements: A pass in Latin 2.
Latin 3 involves the reading of selected Latin texts, translation from Latin into English, and from
English into Latin. A particular author (e.g. Vergil, Ovid, Tacitus, Livy), work or genre is studied each
term. Texts may be set for self-study.
Greek and/or Latin Honours Courses
Postgraduate, full-year course. Entrance requirements: A completed degree with Latin 3 and/or
Greek 3 as a major, with a final mark of 60% or above in the relevant subject(s).
Five papers, tailored to the interests of the student, are written. One paper is a research essay of 8-
10,000 words, the other four are coursework. Taught papers may cover individual Classical authors,
literary genres, ancient history, religion, art and society, with a focus on the critical analysis of Greek
and Latin texts.


MA & PhD in Greek and/or Latin


These degrees are offered and are examined by full thesis.

Last Modified: Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:06:55 SAST



Rhodes>Classics>Courses

CLASSICAL STUDIES (2021) FAQ

WHAT IS CLASSICS?


The study of civilisations, with a particular focus on those of the ancient Mediterranean, from
a multi-disciplinary perspective: history, archaeology, art, anthropology, mythology, religion,
philosophy, politics, gender, sexuality and, above all, literature. We also offer degree
courses in the languages of these cultures: Ancient Greek and Latin.

WHAT FIRST YEAR COURSES ARE ON OFFER?

Classics 101 (History, Literature) in the first semester and Classics 102 (Mythology,
Philosophy) in the second semester. NO LANGUAGE ACQUISITION IS REQUIRED FOR
CLASSICS. Latin 101 and 102 (you start from scratch), Greek 101 and 102 (ditto). THESE
COURSES CAN BE TAKEN SEPARATELY.

WHERE AND WHEN ARE THESE COURSES OFFERED?

In the first semester all lectures and tutorials will be posted online on RUConnected. There
will be 3 lectures per week (posted Monday – Wednesday) and a tutorial exercise. There will
also be a Q&A session with the module lecturer online every Friday. When face-to-face
classes resume, the lecture venue for Classics 101 and 102 is Eden Grove Red. Latin and
Greek classes, and Classics tutorials, take place in the Classics Museum and the Seminar
Room (F3 and F4 in the School of Languages building).

CAN I MAJOR IN ANY OF THE CLASSICS COURSES?

Yes, Classics, Latin and Greek are all 3-year majors. You can also begin Classics in your
second year and take it as a 2-year major.

CAN I CONTINUE STUDYING CLASSICS AT A POSTGRADUATE LEVEL?

Yes, we offer Honours, Masters and Doctoral programmes in all three subjects.

WILL THERE BE TUTORIALS?

Yes, there are weekly tutorials in all three. You will be assigned to a tutorial group/tutor in the
first week and tuts will begin in the second. In the first semester, while classes are online,
tutorial groups will meet each Friday as a WhatsApp group. Your assigned tutor will mark
your coursework and provide any guidance you need.

WHO ARE MY LECTURERS?

The permanent teaching staff are Daniel Malamis (d.malamis@ru.ac.za) and David van
Schoor (d.vanschoor@ru.ac.za, on sabbatical during the first semester of 2021). Peta Fox
(petaannfox@gmail.com) and Glyn Lloyd-Jones (lloydjones74@gmail.com), the section’s
doctoral students, will also be your lecturers in 2021. Lecturers can be contacted by email for
any Classics related questions.

WHAT WILL I GET OUT OF CLASSICS?

Classics will encourage your critical thinking and develop your writing skills. You will gain
knowledge of the ancient past and an understanding of its broadest patterns. You will read
some of the greatest literature ever produced and develop an appreciation of ancient art and
literature.

Last Modified: Mon, 15 Mar 2021 10:09:51 SAST